ADOPT A SHELTER DOG, WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

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Currently, the shelters are becoming more and more saturated.

Dogs and cats patiently wait to find a family that will offer them a new life away from bars. But what are the precautions to take before adopting a dog from a shelter?

ADOPT A SHELTER DOG, WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
ADOPT A SHELTER DOG, WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

TAKE YOUR DOG IN BREEDING?

Ah this famous endless debate about the fact that it is absolutely necessary to adopt and not to buy.
Which is better?

dog, shelter, adoption, adopt

I myself took two dogs in breeding.
Why ?
I’ve wanted a Pug and a Welsh Corgi Cardigan for years. These breeds appealed to me for different reasons that make me personal.

I did a lot of research to find the right breeders, reliable, respectful of the dog, and with whom the feeling would go well.
And I have no regrets. They are two dogs balanced and well in their paws at the moment.

Buying a breeding dog is not dramatic.

This allows you to pay attention to genetics, diseases the breed may face, etc.

It is also recommended to be able to visit the breeding and discuss with the breeder in an open way. This will guarantee the reliability of the place.

ADOPT A SHELTER DOG, WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
ADOPT A SHELTER DOG, WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

ADOPT A SHELTER DOG?

Shelters are filled with dogs of all sizes and breeds.

How to choose the dog that will suit you, and what questions to ask before adopting?

How to find a good shelter to adopt a dog?

Doing a search on the internet will allow you to find associations near you.
Among the best known, you can find the SPA (Society for the Protection of Animals) or the 30 Million Friends Foundation.

Adopting a dog from a shelter will also save two dogs: the one you will adopt and the next one who will find a place at the shelter to be adopted soon, which is a great action.

Ask yourself the right questions before adopting a dog from a shelter

An adoption, whether in breeding or in a shelter, must be a carefully considered act. You have to find out about a dog’s needs, why you want to adopt and your ability to provide him with what he needs during the years you will live together.

Most shelters will ask you different questions in order to get to know you better and to direct you to the person who will suit you best.

It will be necessary to think about the size, the character and the temperament of the dog.
Do not take a Border Collie if you are not a great sportsman for example.

You will also have to think about the age of the dog.

Would you like to save an old dog to give him a sweet life for his last days? Or are you looking for a young and more dynamic dog?

A puppy (because there may be some in a shelter. My Belgian Shepherd Groenendael comes from the SPA and I adopted him when he was 3 months old) will require a lot of energy and a lot of attention from you. You will need to have time ahead of you to take care of a little ball of nerve that will discover life.

An adult dog will surely be more stable but may have some trauma related to abandonment.
A senior dog will be much calmer but may require more veterinary care due to his advanced age.

So these are questions to ask yourself before getting started.

The costs related to the adoption will be totally variable according to the association but count around 250€ for an adult dog and 350€ for a puppy. These will be chipped, vaccinated and will have had a veterinary check-up to ensure the good health of the individual.

Some dogs will be in SOS (free gift) because of their age or their health problems (deaf dog for example).

ADOPT A SHELTER DOG, WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
ADOPT A SHELTER DOG, WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

THE EDUCATION OF A SHELTER DOG

Many people are still reluctant to adopt an adult dog from a shelter because of the behavioral problems that it can develop following its abandonment.
I’m not going to lie to you, it’s not totally wrong.

Shelter dogs can also be nicknamed “goodie bags”.
Because their temperament and behavior will only be revealed after a few days, or even weeks.
This corresponds to the adaptation time in the new environment.

It is obvious that a dog left in a shelter can develop fear, aggression, etc.
But this is not a fatality, nor a generality. Any dog ​​can be worked with the right methods, patience and understanding. And there are a lot of dogs coming out of shelters with whom education went like a letter in the mail without any fuss!

I will again share my testimony with you. I adopted a deaf and visually impaired double merle border collie at the SPA almost a year ago.
She was afraid of her surroundings in general, had never seen a harness and leash in her life, and had seen too few humans and dogs.
The beginnings were chaotic, but the bond was created and in a few months, she became an all-purpose dog who broke down all the barriers around her. No one believed her, and she surprised everyone with her adaptability.

So do not hesitate to ask many questions to the employees of the shelter or to the managers of the associations. It is better to be interested and serious, it will reassure them.
And most animal protection associations also collaborate with canine educators in a positive way.
This will allow you to start off on the right foot with your new protégé without waiting for problems to arise and you will be able to build your relationship from the start with as few mistakes as possible!



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